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Keeping children safe

Keeping Children Safe

 

All adults working at The Manor School are aware of their responsibility to safeguard and promote the welfare of every pupil, both physically and emotionally, inside and outside of school. We recognise that staff are well placed to observe the outward signs of abuse. This includes ensuring that pupils are protected from significant harm and there is a positive commitment to ensure the satisfactory development and growth of individuals. Everyone at The Manor School is aware of, and when necessary follows, the schools Child Protection policy which is in line with the Department of Education's (DfE) and Wiltshire's Local Safeguarding Children's Board (LSCB) practice and procedures. Please click here for our Child Protection Policy

 

If we are concerned about a child we will contact parents to discuss our concerns. On occasions where we cannot contact families or we feel a child may be placed at further harm if our concerns are shared we may contact social care for advice. Our designated staff who champion keeping children safe are Miss Kerry Haines, headteacher and lead safeguarding officer, and Mrs Jacqueline White, Deputy Safeguarding officer. Mrs White is employed for 15 hours a week to focus on keeping children safe so if you have any concerns or questions please feel free to contact her via the main reception desk. We also have a designated safeguarding governor, Ms Chris Harvey.

E-Safety

Whilst many Internet Service Providers offer filtering systems and tools to help you safeguard your child at home, it remains surprisingly easy for children to access inappropriate material including unsuitable text, pictures and movies. Parents are advised to set the security levels within Internet Explorer or other browsers with this in mind. Locating the computer in a family

area where possible, not a bedroom will enable you to supervise your son or daughter as they use the Internet. Also consider mobile phones and games consoles and other devices that can access the internet. However, don’t deny them the opportunity to learn from and enjoy the wide variety of material and games available on the Internet. Instead discuss with them some simple rules for keeping safe online and making sure they understand their importance. Just as you taught them how to cross the road safely by doing it alongside you, then taking the lead and finally doing it on their own - staying safe online needs the same approach.

 

Radicalisation & Extremism

The parent/child relationship is the foundation to keeping children safe and supporting their social development and educational attainment. Parenting can be a challenging task. Maintaining a positive relationship can sometimes be difficult as children grow and develop and seek an identity that may be different from their own family.

Children and young people have a natural curiosity which as parents we want to encourage. However, as our children grow up we haveto take different steps to ensure their safety. Currently a number of young girls and boys have been persuaded to leave the country against the wishes of their families, or in secret, putting themselves in extreme danger.

Why might a young person be drawn towards extremist ideologies?

  • They may be searching for answers to questions about identity,faith and belonging
  • They may be driven by the desire for ‘adventure’ and excitement
  • They may be driven by a need to raise their self-esteem and promote their ‘street cred’
  • They may be drawn to a group or individual who can offer identity, social network and support
  • They may be influenced by world events and a sense of grievance resulting in a need to make a difference.

How might this happen?

Online

The internet provides entertainment, connectivity and interaction. Children may need to spend a lot of time on the internet while studying and they use other social media and messaging sites such as Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, Instagram, Vine or Whatsapp.

These can be useful tools but we need to be aware there are powerful programmes and networks that use these media to reach out to young people and can communicate extremist messages.

Peer interaction

Young people at risk may display extrovert behaviour, start getting into trouble at school or on the streets and mixing with other children who behave badly but this is not always the case.

Sometimes those at risk may be encouraged, by the people they are in contact with, not to draw attention to themselves. As part of some forms of radicalisation parents may feel their child’s behaviour seems to be improving: children may become quieter and more serious about their studies; they may dress more modestly and mix with a group of people that seem to be better behaved than previous friends.

TV and media

The media provide a view on world affairs. However, this is often a very simple version of events which are in reality very complex. Therefore children may not understand the situation fully or appreciate the dangers involved in the views of some groups.

Recognising extremism

  • Out of character changes in dress, behaviour and peer relationships
  • Secretive behaviour
  • Losing interest in friends and activities
  • Showing sympathy for extremist causes
  • Glorifying violence
  • Possessing illegal or extremist literature
  • Advocating messages similar to illegal organisations such as “Muslims Against Crusades” or other non-proscribed extremist
    groups such as the English Defence League.

How can parents support children and young people to stay safe?

  • Know where your child is, who they are with and check this for yourself
  • Know your child’s friends and their families
  • Keep lines of communication open, listen to your child and talk to them about their interests
  • Encourage them to take up positive activities with local groups that you can trust
  • Talk to your child about what they see on the TV or the internet and explain that what they see or read may not be the whole picture
  • Allow and encourage debate and questioning on local and world events and help them see different points of view
  • Encourage your child to show an interest in the local community and show respect for people from all faiths and backgrounds
  • Help your child to understand the dangers of becoming involved in situations about which they may not have the full information
  • Teach them that expressing strong views and trying to change things for the better is fine but they should not take violent action against others or support those that do
  • Be aware of your child’s on-line activity and update your own knowledge
  • Know what social media and messaging sites your child uses
  • Remind your child that people they contact over the internet may be pretending to be someone else or telling them things that are not true.
  • Explain that anyone who tells them to keep secrets from their family or teachers is likely to be trying to do them harm or
    put them in danger.

Resources

There are lots of leaflets and resources you can use to help you keep your child safe and to talk about situations which may feel uncomfortable.

 

NSPCC/O2 Online Safety Helpline: This helpline provides practical, technical advice including parental controls on electronic devices, adjusting privacy settings, understanding social networks, and information about online gaming. 0808 800 5002

 

 

NSPCC Helpline – Parents , carers and members of the public can contact the NSPCC helpline whenever they’re worried about a child by calling 0808 800 5000, emailing help@nspcc.org.uk, texting 88858* or contacting us online at nspcc.org.uk/ helpline. The helpline is free, available 24/7 and calls can be made anonymously. This service can also be used for general advice and guidance